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By its nature, a marriage requires tremendous amounts of time and energy in order for it to survive — let alone thrive. Needless to say, if one’s occupation also requires an equal amount of time and energy, then it may not be surprising when a divorce ensues. While there are seemingly endless career choices for Pennsylvania residents, there are several occupations that tend to have a higher divorce rate.

Probably not surprisingly, careers that require close contact with strangers or co-workers tend to have a negative effect on one’s marital bliss. These jobs encompass those careers that include the arts — such as dancing and acting, as well as professional athletes. However, those who work as massage therapists and even bartenders also record a higher rate of divorce. Those who are employed by gambling establishments also report more than the average rate of divorces, though those who work closely with cash transactions seem to be the most at risk.

It may be surprising to some that the rate for divorce is also higher than average for some factory workers and machinists. It is thought that these jobs often result in workers becoming alienated while they are engrossed in the repetitious and monotonous routine often performed by lower earning workers with fewer educational opportunities. Other occupations that made it on a list of higher risk jobs are switchboard operators, nurses and other care givers. These particular jobs often require long hours, close association with others and a high stress level — all of which can take a toll on a marriage.

There are many careers that can add to the stresses that a marriage may be experiencing. None of these occupations will necessarily lead to a divorce filing; however, if a marriage is strained, then it may be more likely that the spouses will become more estranged. Pennsylvania residents who are considering divorce may benefit from the guidance and support that an experienced family law attorney can provide. 

Source: USA Today, “Workplace worries: 10 jobs with the highest divorce rates“, Michael Hoon, Oct. 19, 2017